CR takes ‘concrete’ steps to curb trespassing | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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CR takes ‘concrete’ steps to curb trespassing

In a bid to bring down the number of deaths on rail tracks especially due to trespassing, the Central Railway (CR) is looking at constructing concrete cement RCC boundary walls, supposedly sturdier than those made of stone.

mumbai Updated: Jun 18, 2010 01:37 IST
Shashank Rao

In a bid to bring down the number of deaths on rail tracks especially due to trespassing, the Central Railway (CR) is looking at constructing concrete cement RCC boundary walls, supposedly sturdier than those made of stone.

Every day 10 deaths are reported on tracks out of which nearly 50 per cent occur due to trespassing say railway officials.

“We will construct these RCC walls from Sion to Kanjurmarg which are sturdier and difficult to get damaged in case anti-social elements try to break them. That way there are chances that cases of trespassing might decrease,” said M.C. Chauhan, Divisional Railway Manager, CR.

These walls are being built at a cost of Rs 3.42 crore but will be shorter in length, standing at a height of 2.6 meters instead of the earlier 3 meters. They will be one-ft thick.

The CR will first construct thick frames of the walls on both sides of the tracks on a 12-km stretch to prevent trespassing. The construction is expected to complete in one year.

“The boundary walls at areas like Dharavi (near Sion station) have a height of 3 feet. But recently we decided to reduce its height as there can be a scope to have barbed wire fencing on top,” said a senior CR official on condition of anonymity.

On an average, the CR has to repair a weak damaged boundary wall every nine months. These crevices in walls are used as shortcuts by trespassers either to reach the platform or cross tracks. The CR will also seek help from local and railway police to ensure there is no damage to these walls.

Areas where the stone walls have been damaged, will temporarily get metal bar fencing. They also plan to display images of accidents due to trespassing at crucial spots where boundary walls are usually broken, to create awareness.

They have already mounted an image of a victim’s expression at Wadala, who comes under the wheels of a train, while trespassing.