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Curious students calculate their scores online

On Tuesday morning Harsh Khara, 15, found out that he got a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 9.8, when the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) results were declared. Bhavya Dore reports.

mumbai Updated: Jun 01, 2011 02:05 IST
Bhavya Dore

On Tuesday morning Harsh Khara, 15, found out that he got a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 9.8, when the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) results were declared.

After checking in to the results website, Khara made another stopover: to a ‘CGPA to Percentage Calculator’ website, to find out how his score translated. It was a 93.1%. He spent the morning popularising the site among his group of friends.

This is the second year that the CBSE employed the grading system instead of giving marks. But students are still curious to know how their grades translate into marks.

“We will only be showing them their grades,” said Jose Kurian, principal of DAV School in Nerul. “It is human curiosity that students want to know their scores.”

“I had parents calling me to ask whether their children had topped, and who was the topper,” said M Subramanian, vice-principal of Navy Children School in Navy Nagar. “I told them all their children were toppers.”

Last year, students were able to access their marks online by using the school code and affiliation code to access the data available to schools. Some students admitted to trying to do the same this year too.

“Some students tried logging on to the site through the school details, but were somehow unable to do so,” said a parent of a Class 10 student.

This is the first year that the board introduced the system of summative and formative assessments system with a 60% weightage for year-round school-based assessments and a 40% weightage for year-ending exams (either a school or board exam).

“Hopefully, students will be less marks-oriented over time,” said Vineet Joshi, chairperson of the board.