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Deaths in city in 2010 highest in a decade

mumbai Updated: Mar 16, 2011 01:28 IST
Bhavika Jain

More than 97,000 people died in Mumbai in 2010, the highest in the past decade.

Data compiled by the health department of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) shows that the number of deaths recorded in 2010 was 97,371, at least 7,000 more than what was recorded in 2009 and 10,000 more than what was recorded in 2005, when Mumbai faced the deluge.

According to the data, 10% of these deaths were due to accidents and the rest were from natural causes such as monsoon related illnesses, tuberculosis (TB), HIV/AIDS, pneumonia, respiratory tract diseases and heart attacks.

“This year the city saw a surge in malaria and monsoon related diseases deaths the number of deaths due to TB and HIV/AIDS have also gone up,” said a senior civic health officer who is studying the data.

In 2009, more than 9,000 people died of TB and HIV/AIDS. The number went up to 12,000 in 2010.

Deaths due to heart and respiratory ailment have also seen an increase in 2010 with more than 400 deaths.

Mumbai comes first in the prevalence and deaths due to HIV/AIDS infection in India, according to figures released by Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

Monsoon related ailments caused 55% more deaths in 2010 at 156 deaths as against 105 in 2009.

The city had witnessed an alarming number of malaria cases during last year’s monsoon, forcing the BMC to take up strong measures to prevent the breeding of mosquitoes.

Civic officials said of the total number of deaths due to natural causes or illnesses, more than 30% were those of people who came from outside Mumbai to civic and private hospitals here for treatment.

“The kind of treatment available in our major hospitals attract a lot of people from outside the city.

More than 40% of the patients in the out patients department are from outside the city,” said a senior doctor from KEM, requesting anonymity because he is not authorised to speak to the media.

The number of deaths due to accidents rose by 10% in 2010 but the exact number is yet to be compiled, civic sources said. In 2009, there were 2,041 accidental deaths. Of these, 743 were road accidents.

Deaths are also due to old age, maternal mortality deaths also increased in 2010.

The lowest number of deaths, 84680, was recorded in 2002.

Civic birth control programme loses steam

More than 97,000 people died in Mumbai in 2010, the highest in the past decade.

Data compiled by the health department of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) shows that the number of deaths recorded in 2010 was 97,371, at least 7,000 more than what was recorded in 2009 and 10,000 more than what was recorded in 2005, when Mumbai faced the deluge.

According to the data, 10% of these deaths were due to accidents and the rest were from natural causes such as monsoon related illnesses, tuberculosis (TB), HIV/AIDS, pneumonia, respiratory tract diseases and heart attacks.

“This year the city saw a surge in malaria and monsoon related diseases deaths the number of deaths due to TB and HIV/AIDS have also gone up,” said a senior civic health officer who is studying the data.

In 2009, more than 9,000 people died of TB and HIV/AIDS. The number went up to 12,000 in 2010.

Deaths due to heart and respiratory ailment have also seen an increase in 2010 with more than 400 deaths.

Mumbai comes first in the prevalence and deaths due to HIV/AIDS infection in India, according to figures released by Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

Monsoon related ailments caused 55% more deaths in 2010 at 156 deaths as against 105 in 2009.

The city had witnessed an alarming number of malaria cases during last year’s monsoon, forcing the BMC to take up strong measures to prevent the breeding of mosquitoes.

Civic officials said of the total number of deaths due to natural causes or illnesses, more than 30% were those of people who came from outside Mumbai to civic and private hospitals here for treatment.

“The kind of treatment available in our major hospitals attract a lot of people from outside the city.

More than 40% of the patients in the out patients department are from outside the city,” said a senior doctor from KEM, requesting anonymity because he is not authorised to speak to the media.

The number of deaths due to accidents rose by 10% in 2010 but the exact number is yet to be compiled, civic sources said. In 2009, there were 2,041 accidental deaths. Of these, 743 were road accidents.

Deaths are also due to old age, maternal mortality deaths also increased in 2010.

The lowest number of deaths, 84680, was recorded in 2002.