Delays, confusion mark junior college admissions | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Delays, confusion mark junior college admissions

The education department released the first merit list for admission to junior colleges more than three hours later than the scheduled 5 pm on Friday, causing considerable anxiety amongst students.

mumbai Updated: Jul 31, 2010 01:26 IST
HT Correspondent

The education department released the first merit list for admission to junior colleges more than three hours later than the scheduled 5 pm on Friday, causing considerable anxiety amongst students.

After a smooth online admission process so far, it finally put up the seat allocations for the coveted bifocal, or vocational, courses within the science and commerce streams on its admission website after 8 pm.

Students did not receive the promised SMS informing them about which colleges they got into. The admission helpline, too, wasn't functional after 5 pm.

Colleges could not access merit lists until 10.30 pm, by which time it was too late to display percentage cut-offs for students.

"First, we had to deal with the delay due to court cases. Just when we thought things had been sorted out, the first list got delayed," said Mayuri Pednekar, a student.

School Education Minister Balasaheb Thorat said that everything would be sorted out by Saturday morning.

"There was confusion over students applying through reservation quotas and some technical glitches. Students and colleges need not panic," he said.

"We've been trying to log in to the website since 7.30 pm but could not access our list. I hope this not the beginning of another series of glitches like last year," said Kirti Narain, principal, Jai Hind College.

This is the third year of online admissions and glitches have marred the process every year.

Anxious students waited on college campuses for two hours.

Once they got their allocations, some were disappointed about not getting into colleges of their preference despite high scores.

"Even with 93.1 per cent, I got into the college that I had listed as my seventh preference. How high should scores be to get into good colleges?" asked Monica Jain, a SSC board student.

The second list will be out on August 5.