Diesel mafia is worth `100 cr, say police | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Diesel mafia is worth `100 cr, say police

mumbai Updated: Nov 02, 2010 02:24 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Marine diesel smuggler and key Dawood Ibrahim aide Mohammad Ali Abu Bakr Sheikh’s, 54, annual turnover will rival any blue chip firm.

The annual income generated from Ali’s global enterprises would run into several crores, said the police. Or “around Rs 100 crore,” said joint commissioner of police, crime, Himanshu Roy.

Ali was arrested last month in connection with the murder of diesel smuggler Sayyed Madar alias Chandbhai. He has been booked under the Maharashtra Control of Organised Crime Act and is in judicial custody.

The crime branch got wind of Ali’s wealth while conducting searches at his residence and office premises.

“We came across several diaries and computers enlisting his business transactions,” Roy said. The crime branch has now engaged forensic auditors to go through all transactions and compile the findings.

“There are several anomalies and malpractices in these transactions. We will prepare a separate dossier on the business transactions and write to agencies like the Income Tax (I-T), Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI), the Enforcement Directorate (ED) and the Customs department to initiate an inquiry,” Roy said.

Ali was a cycle mechanic in the docks about 20 years ago before joining hands with Dawood Ibrahim. He now runs an empire that has 11 offices in several places of India and abroad. One office is located in Dubai while another in Singapore.

He has offices in Wadi Bunder and Bandra. Most of these companies are engaged in marine products, transportation and export/import activities.

Roy said most of Ali’s trade was conducted in cash, including the overseas business offices. In just an instance, the crime branch came across an entry where Rs 65 lakh had been paid in a day towards filling diesel in his fleet of heavy vehicles. “This is something no one can ignore,” Roy said.