Discipline a must to ease Traffic woes, says Advocate | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Discipline a must to ease Traffic woes, says Advocate

The traffic situation in the city can be improved provided commuters and the authorities concerned imbibe some discipline.

mumbai Updated: Oct 08, 2010 03:25 IST
HT Correspondent

The traffic situation in the city can be improved provided commuters and the authorities concerned imbibe some discipline.

This is what advocate Armin Wandrewala, member of the Bombay Bar Association, suggested in his affidavit that was filed in the Bombay High Court.

The affidavit suggested: “Driving schools need to be more particular in their training and Regional Transport Offices inspectors more strict while granting licences. There should be, apart from the driving test, a test to determine knowledge of road signs, signals and traffic rules and regulations.”

Wandrewala filed the affidavit supporting a public interest litigation filed by the Bombay Bar Association in February seeking strict compliance, implementation and enforcement of traffic laws and rules for the safety of pedestrians.

More regard, tolerance and respect should be shown “L” sign on vehicles and ensure that learners were not intimidated.

He even suggested zero tolerance for any form of corruption. The affidavit blames corruption for the bad state of roads and pavements, which play a major role in traffic congestion.

“The mindset of the public needs to be changed and sensitized. Unless there is an attitudinal change in at least the majority of the public, traffic discipline will remain a mere dream,” the affidavit said.

The affidavit suggested that the traffic police ensure that cyclists too follow rules.

The affidavit also said: “Open drains, potholes, loose gravel, cobbles pried loose all add to the dismal state of our roads, posing danger to motorists and pedestrians alike.”

While hearing the PIL filed by the Bombay Bar Association, the government had told the court in August that the increasing population and subsequent increase in traffic are the major factors that cause traffic woes.