Doctors use mesh and glue to fix rare skull fracture | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Doctors use mesh and glue to fix rare skull fracture

mumbai Updated: Jul 22, 2011 01:29 IST
Sonal Shukla

When Bhayander resident Yogesh Rathod looked at the mirror on Thursday, an ugly squint in his left eye was barely visible. The 22-year-old had developed the defect after his head banged against a rod inside a crowded train resulting in a rare skull fracture in February. The five-month-old rare treatment at Cumballa Hill Hospital ended on Thursday.

The accident had forced Rathod to quit his new job. “The train was jam-packed. At one point, my head hit against the rod,” he recalled. “That day I didn’t feel anything. But the next day, I was bleeding profusely from the nose and mouth.”

Doctors said that Rathod’s case was rare because it involved the fracture of the forehead, margin of orbit (the eye cavity) and trochlea (a pulley system that helps the eye move). “Owing to the fracture, the pulley system was detached from the forehead bone. Due to this, the eye muscles that pass through this pulley were becoming smaller and over a period of six months they would have stopped functioning,” said Dr Sunil Moreker, eye surgeon, Cumballa Hill Hospital. “This could have led to double vision,” he added.

According to Dr Moreker, there has been no satisfactory treatment for this kind of an injury in medical literature.

On June 11, doctors operated on Rathod with the help of glue and mesh. “It was not possible to treat this kind of fracture in the forehead with screw and plates, the usual procedure,” said Dr Moreker. The doctors used the tissue glue to stick the pulley and the bone and mesh to support the bone fracture. “We are in the process of sending it for publication in the British journal of case reports,” added Dr Morekar.

“Restoring the structure back to its original state is not very easy,,” said Dr Preetam Samant, eye surgeon at JJ Hospital. “I am happy that I can now travel by train fearlessly,” said Rathod who got a new job in June.