Drunk drivers to be clicked | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 27, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Drunk drivers to be clicked

The death of 22-year-old Deepak Paikrao while serving a four-day sentence for drink driving as a proxy for his employer has forced the traffic police to think of ways to curb cases of impersonation.

mumbai Updated: Jul 19, 2010 01:11 IST
Megha Sood

The death of 22-year-old Deepak Paikrao while serving a four-day sentence for drink driving as a proxy for his employer has forced the traffic police to think of ways to curb cases of impersonation.

The traffic police will soon start taking photographs of people caught for the offence.

Deputy Commissioner of Police (Traffic) Nandkumar Chougule said the traffic police will start clicking photographs of people caught for drink driving and attach the photographs to documents showing their identities.

"We will send the photographs along with our chargesheet to court so that arrested offender cannot send proxies," said Chougule.

Shrikant Kamble, a civic contractor was caught for driving under the influence of alcohol at Ghatkopar on July 9.

Kamble did not have his licence when he was caught. The traffic police seized his motorcycle, asked him to pay a deposit of Rs 2,500 and told him to be present in court on July 12.

Kamble sent Paikrao, his driver, to court instead on July 13. The court and police could not tell that Paikrao was impersonator because they did not have Kamble's photo identity.

The truth was discovered when Paikrao suffered a heart attack when in custody and died on July 14.

Chougule said usually a constable is present in court for identification but in this case Kamble had failed to be present in court on the given date. He sent Paikrao a day after he was supposed to attend court and the other constable on duty could not identify him.

"As a practice, we take the thumb impression of a person when he is caught for verification. This case has proved that taking thumb impression does not work and leaves a loophole in the procedure," said a senior traffic police official requesting anonymity.

"It is not necessary that the traffic police officer who has caught an accused is present in court on the given date, which is another loophole making such impersonations possible."