Engineers will now be BMC road guardians | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Engineers will now be BMC road guardians

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation’s (BMC) road department has decided to make specific road engineers responsible for the maintenance of specific roads. Each engineer will be assigned two roads and given the authority to maintain them.

mumbai Updated: Oct 01, 2011 01:22 IST
Sujit Mahamulkar

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation’s (BMC) road department has decided to make specific road engineers responsible for the maintenance of specific roads. Each engineer will be assigned two roads and given the authority to maintain them.

The BMC on Thursday cleared the Rs 577-crore proposal for rebuilding asphalt roads and for cement-concretisation of major roads. Work will begin in the first week of October, and these roads will become the responsibility of specific engineers.

“We will appoint engineers to take care of specific roads. He will act as the guardian of those roads,” said Aseem Gupta, additional municipal commissioner (roads).

There are 90 sub-engineers working in the road department, and work will start on 168 roads, on a 72-km stretch. The engineers will have to ensure these roads are being maintained and will have the power to take decisions about digging permission, filling potholes, cleaning storm water drains, streetlights and zebra crossing. They will be required to coordinate with other departments and agencies, as when required.

Currently, while road maintenance is the job of these engineers, they don’t have any roads assigned to them, which makes them less accountable.

“Basically, faulty design, wrong execution, lack of supervision and clogging of water are four major reasons for bad patches. We have devised the new system for proper maintenance,” said Gupta.

He promises that there will be fewer potholes on the city’s roads next year. “To improve all roads will take at least five to six years. We cannot start work on all roads at the same time,” Gupta said.

The BMC has also decided to implement the much-delayed World Bank-funded project, the Road Maintenance and Management System (RMMS). The RMMS is a software that functions like a tracking system. “The system will store data on road construction, repairs, potholes and with all other details it will indicate which road should take on priority for resurfacing or repairs the next time, before it gets to be in a bad condition,” said Gupta.