Flying schools cannot enroll new students without compliance report | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Flying schools cannot enroll new students without compliance report

mumbai Updated: Jun 27, 2012 02:39 IST
Soubhik Mitra
Soubhik Mitra
Hindustan Times
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India’s aviation safety regulator will not allow flying schools to enroll new students unless they submit a compliance report that was made mandatory earlier this year.

According to a notice issued by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) on June 22, a majority of the 45 flying institutes in the country had failed to submit the civil aviation requirement (CAR) compliance report.

Following revision of training standards in April this year, the DGCA had directed these institutes to submit a report showing adherence to them.

For instance, according to a revised rule, flying schools should maintain an instructor-pupil ratio of 1:30. A trainer cannot teach more than two subjects. Also, the institute’s library should have a set of course books for every 10 students.

"Unless the CAR compliance reports are submitted the institutes cannot enroll fresh batches of students. We have also issued a public notice about the matter on the DGCA website so that students have the option to the check whether an institute has submitted the mandatory reports before seeking admission," said a senior DGCA official requesting anonymity.

Civil aviation ministry sources said that training standards were upgraded earlier this year because the DGCA’s audits found shortcomings in the way flying schools functioned. Surprise audits were conducted last year across at least 40 flying training schools after the fake pilot scam was busted last year.

"Many flying institutes had limited infrastructure as compared to the number of students per batch," said a civil aviation ministry official requesting anonymity. The official added, "Some institutes had one stimulator facility for 100 students, so each student got little time for practical training."