FYJC admission: Last day sees 11% rise in applicants | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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FYJC admission: Last day sees 11% rise in applicants

mumbai Updated: Jun 18, 2016 00:49 IST
HT Correspondent
FYJC admissions

This year, more students have applied online after the government urged all, including those seeking admissions through in-house, minority or management quotas, to apply online. (HT File Photo)

Only two out of three applicants are likely to secure a seat in online admission process for the first-year junior college (FYJC) course this year.

By Friday evening, the last day to register, fyjc.org.in/Mumbai registered an 11% increase in online applications for the 1.49 lakh seats available this year — 2.23 lakh applications were registered this year compared to 2 lakh last year.

This year, more students have applied online after the government urged all, including those seeking admissions through in-house, minority or management quotas, to apply online.

However, Sejal Satpute, who scored 86% in SSC (Class 10) exams, said, this increases the competition for the general category students, who form the majority. “It is unfair to allow minority students to apply online because it means fewer seats for open category students,” said Satpute.

Read: FYJC admissions: 13,000 yet to complete online process

Officials said the number of seats will increase slightly when colleges surrender quota seats. “The problem is not the lack of seats but that students flock to selected colleges,” said BB Chavan, deputy director of education, Mumbai region.

Chavan said the admissions are being held as per the instructions of the Bombay high court. “All the students were asked to register online so that we can track their admission process and check for malpractices. This is what the court had ordered,” said Chavan.

Even on the last day of applications, students were flocking to the directorate for last-minute help. The website also slowed down in the afternoon as too many students logged in. “We procrastinated applying until Friday, which was a bad move as we had to run pillar to post to get the required approvals for the form,” said Bhakti Shah, whose younger brother, Amit, sought admission through the cultural quota.

The quota is for students participating in cultural programmes and they are a part of the online admissions.