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Get set to race for FYJC seat of your choice

On paper, the first year junior college section of Mumbai has got 5,210 more seats. But here’s the catch — most of them have been added to junior colleges attached to schools, which are not quite popular with students. So effectively, the intake capacity of Mumbai’s sought-after colleges hasn’t changed.

mumbai Updated: May 12, 2015 00:54 IST
Online-registration-centers-setup-in-Mumbai-to-assist-students-in-the-FYJC-admissions-Kunal-Patil-HT-file-photo
Online-registration-centers-setup-in-Mumbai-to-assist-students-in-the-FYJC-admissions-Kunal-Patil-HT-file-photo

In case of junior college admissions in Mumbai, numbers just don’t tell the true story.

On paper, the first year junior college section of Mumbai has got 5,210 more seats. But here’s the catch — most of them have been added to junior colleges attached to schools, which are not quite popular with students. So effectively, the intake capacity of Mumbai’s sought-after colleges hasn’t changed.

The new divisions opened at 49 junior colleges in the city have brought the number of seats available to 2.88 lakh, from last year’s 2.83 lakh. The divisions have been set up on self-finance basis in areas such as Dadar, Vile Parle, Jogeshwari, Malad, Kandivli, Borivli, Bhandup, Navi Mumbai and Kalyan, along with some in existing junior colleges.

Education officials fear the seats may not find many takers. “As these seats have been added to relatively unknown junior colleges, only low-scorers opt for them,” said BD Phadtare, deputy director of education, Mumbai region.

Being self-financed, students securing these seats have to pay around Rs 10,000, much higher compared to the Rs 700 paid for aided courses. “The main problem is students apply only to a handful of popular colleges in the city. Unless these colleges increase their seats, the cut-offs will remain high, even though the overall number of seats has gone up,” said Phadtare.

Students, however, have a different approach. “I don’t mind studying in a junior college attached to a school, as long as they are lenient with attendance. I have joined coaching classes for engineering entrance tests, so the college doesn’t make a difference,” said Paras Raikar, an FYJC aspirant, who wants to pursue science.

In case of degree colleges, the scenario is slightly different. While a considerable number of seats at engineering colleges in the state remain vacant at the end of the admission process, the number of students opting for medical and paramedical courses has increased.

Last year, more than 40% of seats in engineering colleges (undergraduate courses) in 367 engineering colleges across the state were unoccupied, according to the data from the state’s higher and technical education department. With no new engineering colleges for the next academic year, experts said the trend is likely to continue.

In case of undergraduate medical courses, the number of students across the state has increased substantially. This year, around 1.94 lakh students have registered for MH-CET 2015, compared to 1.53 lakh candidates last year. Around 7,500 seats are available for undergraduate medical courses, including MBBS, BDS, and BSc Nursing, conducted by the state colleges.

Pravin Shingare, director, Directorate of Medical Education and Research, which conducts the entrance test, said, “The decline in engineering aspirants, scrapping of negative marking and a test based on the state board syllabus have resulted in a rise in the number of medical aspirants. The trend will continue for the next few years.”

Snehalata Deshmukh, former vice-chancellor of Mumbai University (MU) and former dean of Sion hospital, said, “Not just MBBS, several students are opting for paramedical courses including physiotherapy, pharmacy and other streams such as Ayurveda, Unani and homoeopathy.”

FYJC Admissions 2015-16:

Seats available
Stream
Online
Offline
Total
Arts
23,535
15,514
39,049
Science
48,757
37,154
85,911
Commerce
90,549
73,423
1,63,972

Break-up of offline seats
Stream
In-house quota
Minority seats
Management seats
Arts
5,125
8,437
1,952
Science
11,824
21,037
4,293
Commerce
21,686
43,544
8,193


Last year’s figures

Stream

Online

Offline

Total

Arts

23,471
15,088
38,559

Science

47,722
36,494
84,216

Commerce

88,935
72,012
1,60,947


Offline admissions: 2014-15
Stream
In-house
Minority seats
Management seats
Arts
5,003
8,157
1,928
Science
11,649
20,637
4,208
Commerce

21,331

42,639
8,042


First FYJC merit list: Last year’s trends
* St Xavier’s College, Fort: The cut-off percentage at one of the most popular colleges for arts stream rose to 93%, from the 91.66% the previous year

* Jai Hind College, Churchgate: The cut-off for arts jumped to 86.4% from 85.4%, while the cut-off for science stream dropped to 88% from 89.27%

* NM College, Vile Parle: With increasing number of high scorers opting for the commerce stream, its cut-off was 93.4%. The highest score in the merit list was 97.2%

* St Andrew’s College, Bandra: The cut-off for arts rose to 77.2% from 71.64%

Cut-offs in the first merit list in other colleges:
* HR College, Churchgate
Commerce: 91.8%

* DG Ruparel College, Matunga
Commerce: 89.8%
Science: 93%
Arts: 85%

* Sathaye College, Vile Parle
Commerce: 89%
Science: 93.2%
Arts: 72.2%

* ML Dahanukar, Vile Parle
Commerce: 90.6%

* RA Podar College, Matunga
Commerce: 92%

* Ramniwas Ruia College, Matunga
Science: 93%
Arts: 90.2%

* Birla College, Kalyan
Commerce: 87.8%
Science: 92.2%
Arts: 73.8%

* Mithibai College, Vile Parle
Commerce: 91%
Science: 89.8%
Arts: 82.4%

* MCC College, Mulund
Commerce: 91.6%

* KC College, Churchgate
Commerce: 89.6%
Science: 87.8%
Arts: 80.6%

* KJ Somaiya College of Science and Commerce, Vidyavihar
Commerce: 88.4%
Science: 90.8%

* KJ Somaiya College of Arts and Commerce
Commerce: 87.4%
Arts: 71.6%

* Patkar College, Goregaon
Commerce: 88.8%
Science: 91.6%
Arts: 61%

* Bhavans College, Andheri
Commerce: 87.4%
Science: 88.6%
Arts: 68.6%

* SIES College of Commerce & Economics, Sion
Commerce: 90.2%

* SIES College of Arts and Science, Sion
Science: 91.2%
Arts: 73.6%

(The cut-off percentages are according to the information provided by the deputy director of education, Mumbai region. They might differ by a few points than the actual cut-offs at certain colleges owing to cases of transfer of students)

Intake capacity at Mumbai University
Course name
Intake (Seats)
ARTS
FYB.A.
38,962
FYBMM
6,053
BSW (Part-I)
60
BEd
8,465
Law (3 years)
4,460
Law (5 years)
2,320
COMMERCE
FYBCom
1,01,877
FYBCom (Accounts & Finance)
7,440
FYBCom (Banking & Insurance)
7,015
FYBCom (Financial Management)
3,121
FYBMS
17,746
SCIENCE
FYBSc
27,970
FYBSc (Aviation)
360
FYBSc (Forensic Science)
50
FYBSc (Home Science)
200
FYBSc (Hospitality Studies)
2,640
FYBSc (Information Technology)
15,836
FYBSc (Maritime Hospitality studies)
60
FYBSc (Nautical Science)
125
FYBSc (Computer Science)
10,740
FYBSc (Microbiology)
280
FYBSc (Bio-chemistry)
125
FYBSc (Bio-analytical)
60
FYBSc (Bio-technology)
1,470

* Number of seats available for undergraduate engineering courses for academic year 2014-15: 1, 56,067

(With no new colleges to be included, the number is likely to remain same for an academic year 2015-16)

* Number of seats available for undergraduate courses at state medical colleges for 2015-16: Close to 7,500