H1N1 patients contracting other infections too, Mumbai doctors worried | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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H1N1 patients contracting other infections too, Mumbai doctors worried

While Maharashtra has already witnessed the highest number of swine flu deaths ever, doctors in Mumbai are now worried about patients being diagnosed with multiple infections.

mumbai Updated: Sep 13, 2015 21:57 IST
Priyanka Vora
Delhi-has-emerged-as-the-best-performing-state-in-controlling-swine-flu-only-eleven-of-the-3-800-people-infected-succumbed-to-the-virus-Photo-Shutterstock
Delhi-has-emerged-as-the-best-performing-state-in-controlling-swine-flu-only-eleven-of-the-3-800-people-infected-succumbed-to-the-virus-Photo-Shutterstock

While Maharashtra has already witnessed the highest number of swine flu deaths ever, doctors in Mumbai are now worried about patients being diagnosed with multiple infections.

Take the case of a 45-year-old woman who was undergoing treatment at Fortis Hospital, Mulund, for swine flu, dengue and malaria.

“We discharged her recently. She tested positive for all three infections,” said Dr Pradeep Shah, the physician who her. “It is challenging to treat such patients, as the risk of complications is higher.”

Doctors said that transmission of H1N1 cases has been worsened by fluctuations in temperature.

Infectious disease consultant, Dr Om Shrivastav, said the lowered immunity as a result of H1N1 makes patients more vulnerable to other ailments. He has treated eight patients who had swine flu along with other infections, such as dengue, hepatitis E and tuberculosis (TB), he said.

Read:667 die of swine flu in Maharashtra, docs warn cases may go up in winter


“We are treating a 40-year-old woman whose leg will have to be amputated. She has swine flu and Deep Vein Thrombosis with a very low platelet count. She developed gangrene as a result of Deep Vein Thrombosis. Owing to the low platelet we were unable to give her medicines to arrest the gangrene,” said Dr Shrivastav.

Doctors have reported a spurt in dengue cases too. “We had five patients, of which three were diagnosed with both swine flu and dengue. We had not seen such cases in the past,” said Dr Pratit Samdani, physician, Breach Candy hospital, Bhulabhai Desai Road.

Dr Samdani said in another uncommon, worrying trend, patients with dengue are showing signs of liver damage, which could be a result of the severe drop in platelets.

“Many dengue patients are coming in with liver complications. Many of them belong to affluent families,” said Dr Samdani.