How much is too much? | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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How much is too much?

Youngsters in the city feel that the Indian Premier League, better known as the IPL, has killed the charm of cricket. They also feel that the IPL is allegedly fixed and Mumbai Indians is going to emerge winner this edition. HT reports.

mumbai Updated: Apr 11, 2011 01:43 IST
HT Correspondent

Youngsters in the city feel that the Indian Premier League, better known as the IPL, has killed the charm of cricket. They also feel that the IPL is allegedly fixed and Mumbai Indians is going to emerge winner this edition.

These are results of a spot survey conducted by the Rotract Club of HR College at Churchgate last week. About 40 students from the club interviewed 200 people in the age group of 18 to 25. The IPL began on April 8.

“Youngsters, who also follow the English Premiere League, believe that IPL has attained the same stature in India. Despite the frenzy of the World Cup, people are still not done with cricket and are looking forward to the IPL,” said Aniket Jotwani from the college’s Rotract Club who coordinated the survey.

Started in 2008, the IPL was conceived by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI). In 2010, IPL became the first sporting event ever to be broadcast live on YouTube. According to global sports salaries review, IPL is the second highest-paid league — second only to the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Despite youngsters thinking that the IPL is more about business, college students are glad that the IPL is timed with the end of their exams.

“We had exams during the ICC World Cup so we were too stressed to fully enjoy the game but now with our exams ending IPL is a saviour. And this time we will get a chance to go to the stadium and catch a couple of matches,” said Sahil Mehta a final year management student.

Most youngsters are very entertained with the quick, flamboyant cricket format they get to see, but there are a few who love the game. “The IPL is great entertainment but it is not really sport. It does not involve any strategy, it is just quick game of show that will help take the game to other countries,” said Rahul Gaur, a final year student at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IIT-B) in Powai.

“Ask any lover of test cricket and you will get the same response. Also, the players have been through a lot during the World Cup and to me it would seem like a sheer waste for someone like Sachin Tendulkar to invest time in a game where he does not even represent the country.”