Jr colleges surrender 28,000 seats to education department | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Jr colleges surrender 28,000 seats to education department

Junior colleges surrendered nearly 28,000 seats to the education department on Friday after completing the offline admission process, freeing up several thousand more seats for students to be allotted through the online process.

mumbai Updated: Jul 09, 2011 02:21 IST
Bhavya Dore

Junior colleges surrendered nearly 28,000 seats to the education department on Friday after completing the offline admission process, freeing up several thousand more seats for students to be allotted through the online process.

The 27,622 seats surrendered this year include those from the in-house, management and minority quotas, admission to which are conducted by colleges themselves, offline.

“However, this is the not the total number of seats that have been freed up,” said an education department official. “We will continue to get more seats as the seats fall vacant during the course of the admission process.”

For instance, if a student has secured a seat through the offline process but later gets a seat through the online process, he/ she will give up the quota seat, which the college will then surrender to the department.

Last year, there were 36,829 seats surrendered through the offline quotas after three rounds.

With the additional seats now available with the department, it means that there are 1.98 lakh applications for 1.72 lakh seats. However, the number of applications takes a student into account twice, if the student applies for two streams. Since several applicants would have also applied offline, the number of those vying for seats through the online process, would fall further. Last year all students were allotted seats, with nearly 40,000 seats lying vacant at the end of the entire process.

Colleges have said that their minority lists filled up very quickly this year, with students unwilling to take a chance and securing a minority seat if they were eligible to do so.

St Andrew’s and Jai Hind College closed their minority admissions with two instead of three minority lists. At SIES College, most in-house science seats were filled, with very few to return to the department.

“People just don’t want to take any chances,” said Marie Fernandes, principal of St Andrew’s College, Bandra. “The cut-offs were high for the minority lists, and that is likely to be the case for the general lists too.”