Junior college students can now get into Mood-I | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Junior college students can now get into Mood-I

On Sunday, Dristi Jain, 16, will go where no junior college student has legally gone before: Mood Indigo.

mumbai Updated: Dec 17, 2011 02:04 IST
Bhavya Dore

On Sunday, Dristi Jain, 16, will go where no junior college student has legally gone before: Mood Indigo.

Class 11 and 12 students from schools and junior colleges will for the first time be able to attend the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay’s (IIT-B) annual cultural festival this year. Set to begin on Sunday and last until Wednesday, the fest claims to be one of Asia’s biggest college festival. More than 75,000 students attend every year.

“It is known as one of the best fests, so I’m very excited to go,” said Jain, a Class 11 student at Mithibai College in Juhu.

Passes and invitations were sent out to all junior colleges this year. The organisers except about 90,000 to attend this year as a result.

“Over the years we received many requests from junior college students so we decided to allow them this time,” said Ketav Mehta, in charge of media and public relations at Mood Indigo 2011. “Earlier they would try and sneak into the festival but many would get caught.”

Events at Mood Indigo will this year be on a far bigger and grander scale, with international student contingents, a much-awaited progressive rock band Karnivool scheduled to perform and a string of international folk musicians.

“We literally jumped out of our chairs when Karnivool agreed to come and perform,” said Kaustub Pandey, who is in charge of Pronites. “Progressive rock is very big among students these days and Karnivool is really popular.”

The worth of prizes for various competitions has also been amped up, from less than Rs 25 lakh last year to Rs 35 lakh this time, including cash and non-cash prizes.

A host of new miscellaneous events have also been introduced, from a journalism competition to a flagship dance competition event with entries from across the country. For the first time, the fest will have students performing during one of the nights, usually reserved for performances by professional artists.

“We have had awesome registrations from awesome colleges; it’ll be amazing,”said Aditya Poonia, who is in charge of competitions.

The festival is open to any college student with a valid identity card.