Junk food-eating kids prone to nasal ailments | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Junk food-eating kids prone to nasal ailments

For four years, 12-year-old Nafis Yusuf Parmar could neither play with his friends nor attend school regularly as he frequently fell ill.

mumbai Updated: Apr 06, 2010 01:01 IST
Raghav Rao

For four years, 12-year-old Nafis Yusuf Parmar could neither play with his friends nor attend school regularly as he frequently fell ill.

The Class 6 student at Ryan International School, Kandivli, suffered frequent nosebleeds, ear aches, breathlessness and colds until he underwent an operation last week for adenoids, a lymph tissue disorder.

Nafis is not the only child to have had such an experience.

Experts claim that the consumption of junk food, which contain preservatives that could cause allergies, by children has led to an increase in cases of adenoid hypertrophy — a condition when the child’s adenoids swell, causing respiratory and hearing problems.

“My son couldn’t study because he became breathless when he lowered his head. He used to catch a cold or some other infection every 15 days and the other children wouldn’t play with him because he was constantly ill. Even his teachers used to complain that he didn’t listen in class,” said Meenaz Parmar (35), who finally took Nafis to Dr Vikas Agrawal at Speciality Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) Hospital in Kandivli.

Nafis was treated using a fairly new technology called coblation, which is far less painful and risky than the conventional methods like blind surgery.

“Ten to 15 per cent of

children in the city have adenoid-related problems. The inflammation can often cause breathlessness and hearing loss. So, a patient may not be able to hear what is taught in class and find it hard to concentrate. Teachers and parents, being unaware of this condition, often think that the child is lazy or inattentive,” said Agrawal.

Dr Anamika Rathore, ENT surgeon at Cumballa Hill Hospital and Heart Institute said that adenoids usually don’t respond to medication and have to be surgically removed.

“The adenoids start growing from the age of two and provide the child with an immunity boost until the other organs take over. However, they

swell when infected, which blocks the nasal canal and leads to problems like snoring,” said Rathore.

“Also, since the patients breathe through the mouth, they bypass the defence mechanism of the nose and become more susceptible to chest infections. These problems subside once the tissue is removed,” she added.