Kasab yawns as HC hears his appeal | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Kasab yawns as HC hears his appeal

The Bombay High Court on Monday started hearing an appeal of the death sentence handed out to Mohammad Ajmal Amir Kasab, the sole surviving gunman of the 2008 Mumbai attack.

mumbai Updated: Oct 19, 2010 01:02 IST
HT Correspondent

The Bombay High Court on Monday started hearing an appeal of the death sentence handed out to Mohammad Ajmal Amir Kasab, the sole surviving gunman of the 2008 Mumbai attack.

The Pakistani national was sentenced by a special trial court in May.

On Monday, he was in a jovial mood and seemed uninterested in the proceedings. He smiled, yawned and scratched his head showing no signs of remorse as the state opened its arguments on confirmation of his death sentence.
The proceedings were carried out through video conference.

Special public prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam opened the case by narrating the entire sequence of events, which led to the nearly 60-hour seige, killing 166 people and injuring 430.

Nikam described the training of the fidayeens at the Lashkar-e-Tayyeba camps across the border, the selection of the 10 gunmen who carried out the attacks and their journey to Mumbai. He said the 26/11 attack was an act of state-sponsored terrorism.

A division bench of justices Ranjana Desai and Ranjit More praised the fight put up by the Government Railway Police (GRP) and the Railway Police Force (RPF) personnel while countering Kasab and his partner Abu Ismail.

“In the given situation, the police showed great amount of courage,” said Desai. “The announcer [Vishnu Zende] also did a great job.” Referring to the jamming of a police rifle, the judge said, “This is really heartening. They [the force] should learn from the experience.”

The comment came after Nikam described how RPF constable Jillu Yadav and a GRP constable took on Kasab and Ismail at Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus and tried to resist the duo with whatever equipment they had.

Nikam told the court that the prosecution had led cogent evidence against Kasab – evidence of eyewitnesses to the seven incidents in which he had direct participation, circumstantial evidence and technical evidence in support of their charges of conspiracy and waging war against the nation.