KEM Medical College may get derecognised | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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KEM Medical College may get derecognised

One of the country's best medical colleges, Seth GS Medical College attached to KEM Hospital in Parel, has once again been threatened with de-recognition of its MBBS course due to shortage of faculty.

mumbai Updated: Aug 12, 2010 02:08 IST
Neha Bhayana

One of the country's best medical colleges, Seth GS Medical College attached to KEM Hospital in Parel, has once again been threatened with de-recognition of its MBBS course due to shortage of faculty.

The new cabinet-appointed panel, which is overseeing medical education in India, has issued a notice to KEM threatening to derecognise the course if vacant posts are not filled within a month.

The Medical Council of India (MCI) had earlier sent KEM a notice in January threatening to de-recognise the course because of 25 per cent shortage of teaching staff and poor infrastructure among other shortcomings. The MCI was dissolved soon after and the panel took charge.

"KEM is highly preferred by medical students. The new MCI are just trying to streamline the admission process," said Dr Devi Shetty, a panel member. "Mainly because of some issues over norms of recruitment, the KEM authorities could not recruit people. But they are streamlining that," he said.

He added that once the faculty is recruited, the MCI would even be able to increase the MBBS and post-graduate medical seats in the college. "We received the notice yesterday," said KEM Hospital dean Dr Sanjay Oak.

"The new MCI panel can't refer to the old correspondence with us, so a fresh notice has been issued. We will send a point-wise reply to them."

In January, the MCI had pointed out that the college had a deficit of 57 lecturers. Many doctors have been recruited since but KEM still has 35 vacant lecturer posts.

"We have been trying our best to recruit people. Today, the BMC commissioner granted permission for latest recruitment so we hope to fill the posts soon," said Dr Oak.

He added that finding candidates was a big problem.

"We can't break the rules of reservation. Doctors also prefer to take up lucrative jobs in private hospitals rather than working in a BMC hospital," he said. Around 2,000 undergraduate and post-graduate medical students are trained at the 1800-bed KEM hospital every year.