Lessons to help 26/11 police widows get jobs | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Lessons to help 26/11 police widows get jobs

Six months ago, this non-profit organisation helped a group of women survivors of the 26/11 terror attacks to heal their wounds through a swimming session. Now, they plan to empower them with skills to help them earn their living.

mumbai Updated: Nov 24, 2010 01:51 IST
Aarefa Johari

Six months ago, this non-profit organisation helped a group of women survivors of the 26/11 terror attacks to heal their wounds through a swimming session. Now, they plan to empower them with skills to help them earn their living.

On Wednesday morning, Sisters Against Violent Extremism (SAVE), a global campaign launched by the Vienna-based organisation, Women Without Borders, will conduct an interactive discussion with 25 to 30 wives and daughters of policemen, who were victims of the 2008 terror attacks.

The event, to be held at the Police Gymkhana at Marine Drive, is a run up to the planned launch of an income generation programme for the women. It aims to introduce them to a set of practical skills that include accountancy, operating computers, English speaking, mobile repairing and beautician’s training, in which they will then be trained for six months.

“Such a programme will help boost the women’s confidence and self-worth besides giving them a means of earning their own money,” said Archana Kapoor, president of SAVE’s India chapter which was launched last year. Through the programme, the organisation hopes to ensure jobs for at least 50 % of the women participants. “But first it will involve getting these women, who are shy and have suffered a lot of trauma, to come out of their cocoons,” said Kapoor.

According to Vinita Kamte, wife of police officer Ashok Kamte who was killed in the 26/11 attacks, taking lessons in skills such as computer training can help the women keep their minds off the pain.

“These are women who have largely been homebound, so training in a close-knit group with others, who have suffered similarly, can be comforting,” said Kamte, who has been associated with SAVE since April this year, when she attended a conference in Vienna for women who have been through terror.

SAVE plans to launch the income generation programme as part of its Mothers For Change campaign, which believes that women, particularly mothers, can play an influential role in taking a stand against violence, hate and prejudice while raising children.

“The programme will be launched formally as soon as we acquire permissions from the concerned authorities,” said Kapoor.