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Letters from Readers

Letters from Readers

mumbai Updated: Jun 20, 2010 01:26 IST

Govt should intervene on time, and effectively

Education has become just another business. With several international schools coming up, and private schools charging exorbitant fees, middle-class parents are finding it increasingly difficult to cope. Some protests by parents have taken an ugly turn and the school management had to call the police protection.
Private schools have said they have the right to fix fees because the government does not give them any financial assistance and yet expects them to follow all government guidelines.
A government authority to ensure reasonable fees would be a move in the right direction. But the authority would have to take a balanced view and intervene on time.
Bhagwan B. Thadani

The govt should give grants to schools

There is a need for the government to monitor hike in school fees. Many unaided schools face a financial crunch as they have to increase salaries and other expenses. This forces them to take donations during admissions. The state government had stopped grants to all English medium schools since 1977. There is a need for the government to understand the plight of unaided schools and grant them necessary aid.
Cajetan Peter D’Souza

Schools’ whims must be countered

There is certainly a need for setting up a monitoring authority to regulate fee hikes in schools so that education standards are maintained while fees are kept at reasonable levels. Schools cannot have the sole privilege of enhancing the fees according to their whims. With the cost of living going up every other day, it is just not possible for a family, particularly the middle-class, to shell out exorbitant fees.
The rationale for the hike should be placed before the authority, which should consist of members from parent-teachers association also.
Prem K. Menon

Education is a necessity, not luxury

Unregulated fee hikes are unethical. Can schools account for the amount they earn? The government should understand that a hike can be done in luxury but not something necessary. Education is the necessity.
Good education is the right of every citizen and it is the government’s duty to ensure this and cannot relax after clearing the Right to Education. It should help implement it.
C.K. Subramaniam


State’s Best-Five policy unfair

I am a student of Christ Church School (ICSE) and passed my Class 10 exams with 81 per cent (Best-Five 85 per cent). My overall percentage will be considered for my junior college admission. This is unfair.Why are we being discriminated against? We have also worked as hard as any SSC student. How would the SSC students feel if they were in our place? An SSC student getting 78 per cent is getting 83 per cent under the Best-Five policy and will compete with an ICSE student who gets 83 per cent as an overall aggregate. I hope the education minister understands our disappointment and makes changes in the rules regarding college admissions.
Fatema Lokhandwala

Mumbai First: We need action, not words

Kudos to Hindustan Times for representing Mumbai in its truest sense. Your Mumbai First Conclave was enough proof that you care for the city. But what we need from the people who govern the city is not mere words but action. Guardian Minister Jayant Patil has no business to merely say: “If we don’t change the style of governance... the city will collapse.” What is holding him back from acting on his words? Health Minister Suresh Shetty’s assertion that we need educated, qualified people to implement effective schemes is true. Is he or his bureaucracy not educated and qualified enough to act?
MMRDA chief says: “We need public involvement and participation for better governance.”True. But is he attending even a phone call or complaint from he public?
Enough of words. We need action.
Mohan Siroya

Parents should judge, not the government

Government interference is not needed for unaided schools, as the schools have to decide their fee structure according to demand and supply. If these schools have to maintain a certain standard, they have to charge a certain amount from parents who will not mind paying if they get the desired service.
The monitoring authority may unnecessarily come in the way of the school’s functioning and planning. There should be a strong parents’ association to work together with the school whenever needed but at the same time to raise its voice if anything unreasonable is demanded. Parents will be the best persons to handle the situation as it is in the interest of their children.
Sumita Ghosh