Medical body to study Chopra's reports | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Medical body to study Chopra's reports

The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme has asked the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) for the medical records of filmmaker Yash Chopra who died of dengue and related complications on October 21.

mumbai Updated: Nov 09, 2012 01:37 IST
HT Correspondent

The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme, the apex body for prevention of vector-borne diseases, has asked the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) for the medical records of filmmaker Yash Chopra who died of dengue and related complications on October 21.

"We have sent the papers to them and are awaiting their confirmation on the cause of Chopra's death," said D Arun Bamne, executive health officer, BMC.

Doctors at the Lilavati Hospital, where Chopra was seeking treatment, had earlier said that Chopra had developed complications of bacterial pneumonia and dengue, which led to multi-organ failure.

Meanwhile, on Monday, a 35-year-old man from Dahisar allegedly died of dengue at Anju Hospital. "He was being treated for dengue," said Dr MB Vaishya, director of the hospital.

Civic officials have not confirmed that the case was a dengue casualty. "The post-mortem report of the deceased is awaited. Only after getting the report and studying his medical history, will we term it as dengue death," said a civic health official.

A 24-year-old Mumbai resident, suspected to be suffering from dengue, was admitted to the Kohinoor Hospital in Kurla on Thursday. "We suspect that he contracted the disease here, when he came to visit his wife. He developed high fever after reaching his workplace in Dubai. So, he came to Mumbai to get treatment," said Dr Shahid Barmare, physician, Kohinoor Hospital, Kurla.

So far, 27 cases of dengue have been reported in the city in the first week of November. "The number of dengue cases is decreasing. Cooler climate is more conducive for the breeding of Aedes mosquitoe, which spreads the disease. So, our pest control officers are conducting regular checks at the breeding grounds," said Bamne.

Contrary to civic hospital, private hospitals are witnessing more cases of dengue. "You don't need rain to create breeding site for the Aedes mosquito. Fresh water breeding sites in homes and offices could also lead to the disease," said Dr Barmare.