Mistry’s book spurs more online student activism | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Mistry’s book spurs more online student activism

The University of Mumbai’s decision to drop Rohinton Mistry’s book, Such a Long Journey, from the second-year arts syllabus has spurred student activism in the city, even if it is restricted only to online activity.

mumbai Updated: Oct 21, 2010 02:31 IST
HT Correspondent

The University of Mumbai’s decision to drop Rohinton Mistry’s book, Such a Long Journey, from the second-year arts syllabus has spurred student activism in the city, even if it is restricted only to online activity.

Two students — Sanket Bhatt and Shrinath Iyer — from MPSPS College in Bandra have started a Facebook page called, The Chopped Journey, to protest against the university’s decision.

Started two weeks ago, the Facebook page already has 80 people following it.

The students have been innovative in their protest and changed the words on the cover of the book from Such a Long Journey to Such a Chopped Journey.

“When we read about the issue, we knew that something had to done. Aditya Thackeray has not even read the book or the context in which it was written,” said 20-year-old Bhatt, a mass media student.

The Hindustan Times had on Wednesday reported about how an online petition on the issue by two students — one from Tata Institute of Social Sciences and the other from St Xavier’s — had gathered momentum with more than 1,200 signatories. And now more and more seem to be joining the foray against the university and its vice-chancellor.

The vice-chancellor dropped the book within a day of the Bhartiya Vidyarthi Sena and Thackeray meeting him to demand for the book’s withdrawal.

There has been uproar in the academic community at this hasty decision, which ignored discussion or debate.

But, once again, the protest is restricted to the Internet.

“We have had exams for the past two weeks. Now, we will do more. We want to organise a rally and involve a lot more students,” said 23-year-old Iyer.