Mumbai: ‘If not 24x7 nightlife, give us 3am deadline’ | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai: ‘If not 24x7 nightlife, give us 3am deadline’

With the Maharashtra government not making a move on the proposal for a 24-hour nightlife for Mumbai, the India Hotel and Restaurant Association has written to chief minister Devendra Fadnavis, urging him to not give up on the idea entirely.

mumbai Updated: Apr 23, 2015 23:07 IST
Chetna Yerunkar
nightlife

With the Maharashtra government not making a move on the proposal for a 24-hour nightlife for Mumbai, the India Hotel and Restaurant Association has written to chief minister Devendra Fadnavis, urging him to not give up on the idea entirely.

If the 24-hour nightlife is not viable, the association has asked for restaurants and hotels to be allowed to stay open up to 3am, and in all areas of the city.

At present, the proposal has allotted zones where the 24x7 nightlife will be allowed, following a recommendation by the commissioner of police.

In its seven-point letter, the association has also suggested the government simplifies rules and removes the permit system for drinking.

Fewer restrictions on the movement of citizens and tourists at night, developing tourism through malls and entertainment zones and CCTVs and police patrolling at crucial places were some other suggestions.

The proposal to allow the city’s restaurants to serve food and liquor 24x7 has been cleared by the civic body, but for the plan to be implemented, a number of acts and labour laws need to be amended.

Sources said the hotels association decided to write to the CM, as the state had not taken any steps towards implementing the plan.

“The 24-hour nightlife idea is welcome, but if the government feels it is not feasible, then we suggest rather than scrapping the proposal, allow restaurants to stay open till 3am,” said Adarsh Shetty, president, India Hotel and Restaurant Association.

“As we need to strike a balance to maintain the city’s law and order, this could be an alternative,”