Mumbai police help crack cyber crimes, no longer averse to tech | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Mumbai police help crack cyber crimes, no longer averse to tech

The Mumbai police, often criticised for using outdated technology, are now doing their bit to update the technology used in solving crimes. This move comes against the backdrop of criminals becoming tech- savvy, which in turn had led to an increase in cyber-crime incidents in the city.

mumbai Updated: Jul 12, 2012 01:07 IST
Mohamed Thaver

The Mumbai police, often criticised for using outdated technology, are now doing their bit to update the technology used in solving crimes. This move comes against the backdrop of criminals becoming tech- savvy, which in turn had led to an increase in cyber-crime incidents in the city.

In stark contrast to the situation that existed about eight years ago, the Mumbai police are now using technology as an effective investigative tool. In the recent past, the police have used their familiarity with social networking websites to solve two cases.

The first incident took place in January this year when the family of a 16-year-old girl approached the Vinoba Bhave (VB) Nagar police in Kurla (West) to complain about a ‘chat’ friend of the teenager, who duped her of gold jewellery worth Rs5.75 lakh. Even though the VB Nagar police asked the family to write an application and then contact the cyber police, they simultaneously began an investigation of their own. This was despite their lack of knowledge of dealing with crimes on the Internet.

Constable Jayesh Ghoderao, who had an account on the same networking site where the accused and the victim met, was well versed with the way the site functioned. “We checked the chat history and narrowed down on the people with whom he chatted frequently. We also found Joshi’s real mobile number given by his friends online,” said Ghoderao.

Further investigation led the police to Dahisar resident Rakesh Wankhede who had a profile under Aryan Joshi’s name, created to dupe people.

The VB Nagar police’s efforts to crack the case before the crime branch was rewared by police commissioner Arup Patnaik.

In the second incident, the DB Marg police arrested an accused in a case by chatting with him on a networking site pretending to be a girl.

“Earlier staff at local police stations did not even have basic knowledge of computers. So, any case that involved the Internet was passed on to the cyber cell without making any attempt to detect it,” said an police officer from the central suburbs requesting anonymity.

When questioned about how the force had made considerable progress when it came to updating themselves with technology, DCP Nisar Tamboli, spokesperson of the Mumbai police, said “We have to keep pace with criminals, who try to use technology to dodge us. Hence, it was necessary for us to become technologically literate.”