Mumbai’s pothol horror | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 18, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Mumbai’s pothol horror

Even as its latest data showed that there are still 2,722 potholes across the city, the civic body has assured the state-appointed Standing Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) – which advises it on roads – that it will henceforth concentrate on preventive measures instead of being forced to take curative steps such as filling potholes.

mumbai Updated: Jul 29, 2011 01:38 IST
Sujit Mahamulkar

Even as its latest data showed that there are still 2,722 potholes across the city, the civic body has assured the state-appointed Standing Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) – which advises it on roads – that it will henceforth concentrate on preventive measures instead of being forced to take curative steps such as filling potholes.

In other words, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) says it will take more care during the construction of roads so that it does not have to run around filling potholes after a spell of heavy rain.

For a while now, experts have been advising the BMC to pay attention at the initial stage itself. Preventive measures mean that during construction, the scientific method is followed with regard to specifications on mixing asphalt with other material, heating and application.

“The road department has assured the STAC that October onwards, when road constructions and repairs start, we will take preventive measures,” sources from the department said.

The latest data, part of an internal report prepared by the roads department, states that there are 2,722 potholes across 325 locations in the city, and that it has attended to 2, 397 potholes.

Showers over the past two to three days have washed away material used to fill potholes at several spots.

“The world over, there is no solution for potholes when it is raining. Unless you construct better roads, the problem will not be solved,” said Nandkumar Salvi, a member of Road Monitoring Committee (RMC), appointed by the Bombay High Court in 2006.

NV Merani, chairman of the STAC, said: “Repeated digging by utility services also takes its toll.” He suggested that the BMC prioritise identifying roads that might develop potholes during the monsoon and attend to them urgently.

Satish Badwe, chief engineer of the department, chose not to comment.