National quality ratings must for all state colleges | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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National quality ratings must for all state colleges

All colleges that want to continue operating in the state will now have to improve their academic infrastructure and student resource facilities and queue up to be rated by the National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) or the National Board of Accreditation (NBA).

mumbai Updated: Oct 11, 2010 00:58 IST
HT Correspondent

All colleges that want to continue operating in the state will now have to improve their academic infrastructure and student resource facilities and queue up to be rated by the National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) or the National Board of Accreditation (NBA).

In a government order dated October 8, the higher and technical education department made the accreditation mandatory for all institutions in Maharashtra.

Currently, only 25 per cent of these colleges have accreditation.

The government resolution states that experts, including the joint board of vice-chancellors, are of the opinion that the lack of mandatory accreditation has had a negative effect on the quality of higher education.

The University of Mumbai’s NAAC rating expired two years ago; it’s still in the process of applying for fresh accreditation.

“Those institutes that have already got accreditation should get it renewed and those approved after 2001 should send proposals for accreditation latest by November 30,” said Mahesh Phatak, secretary of higher and technical education.

The NAAC and NBA ratings are valid for five years.

They are expected to keep college managements in check, increase competition and give students a fair evaluation of the institutions. While the NAAC accredits traditional arts, science and commerce colleges, the NBA gives quality certificates to professional institutes.

The decision follows directives given by authorities including the high court and the University Grants Commission. The 13 universities in the state through quarterly reviews will have to monitor that the colleges affiliated to them submit accreditation proposals. Institutes that fail to apply can lose their university affiliation.