No beacon lights for sheriff, politicians

The sheriff of the city along with several politicians and government officials will soon lose the red and amber beacon lights on their vehicles.

While hearing a special leave petition, the Supreme Court had, in April 2012, directed the Centre and all state governments to restrict the use of beacons.

The state government had then appointed a committee to revise the list of VIPs and VVIPs entitled to use beacon lights.

Based on their recommendations, the state government has issued a revised list of constitutional and functional authorities entitled to use the light on their vehicles.

Consequently, chairmen of all statutory development corporations and other government corporations such as MSRTC, police officials of additional DGP rank will lose the right to use beacon lights on their vehicles, along with the sheriff of Mumbai, said sources.

“We have revised the list of people entitled to use red and amber beacon lights on their vehicles, which will also be available on the motor vehicle department’s official website,” said SK Sharma, transport secretary, adding that the date from which the rule will come into effect will soon be announced.

The general manager of BEST undertaking, vice-chancellors of universities, chief forest conservator, additional police commissioner (traffic), CEOs of district councils and several other government officials, judges, police officers will lose the amber beacon lights on their vehicles, said an official from the transport department.

The state has also decided restrict use of red flashing lights to VVIPs such as governor, chief minister, deputy chief minister, Opposition leaders, among others.

The government also plans to change the colour of the light for ambulances to red with purple glass, instead of the current blue light. The escort vehicles for VVIPs will be permitted to use blue flashing lights, while multi-coloured red, blue and white lights can be used only for emergency duties, according to the notification.

 

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