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No room for placements

mumbai Updated: Apr 05, 2011 01:14 IST
Kiran Wadhwa

Turning the tradition of campus placements on its head, the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) is planning to do away with its placement process next year for a part of its student population and create social entrepreneurs instead.

Placements are usually the USP of institutes and so far their masters course in social entrepreneurship always had campus placements. But the institute now wants to create a generation of socially inclined entrepreneurs.

“From next year, we are doing away with the campus placement process for that particular course and create social entrepreneurs instead. We will provide students with seed money of Rs 2 lakh to 6 lakh, depending on their venture and try and cover their recurring expenses,” said S Parasuraman, director, TISS.

There are about 35 students who have taken up the course.

The institute had first experimented with the idea two years ago and set up a Centre for Social Entrepreneurship. Two students from the batch that passed out in 2009 opted for social entrepreneurship and in 2010 three students took it up. Faculty members are hoping that from the current batch at least five students would opt to become social entrepreneurs.

“Apart from providing initial funding, we also want to be a platform where we connect students with venture capitalists and build a network for them. We are raising funds for students from various stakeholders,” said Samapti Guha, associate professor and coordinator for the Centre for Social Entrepreneurship.

Those who took up the opportunity do not regret their choice.

Ramana Babu Killi was one of the two people from the 2009 batch who took up social entrepreneurship while his peers got placed in companies.

“I wanted to work for my community in Andhra Pradesh and have set up a venture where I provide farm machinery on hire at subsidised rates,” said the 26-year-old.