Organ donation to become easier for patients | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 27, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Organ donation to become easier for patients

The state is all set to make organ donation more patient-friendly and tighten the noose on those indulging in the illegal trade of organs.

mumbai Updated: Sep 08, 2010 03:01 IST
Sayli Udas Mankikar

The state is all set to make organ donation more patient-friendly and tighten the noose on those indulging in the illegal trade of organs.

The state cabinet, on Wednesday, will consider making changes to the State Transplantation of Human Organs Act, 1994 as recommended by the Centre.

A senior official from the medical education department said the proposed amendment will bring great relief to patients suffering from renal failure. It will extend the donor definition from the current ‘near relative’, which it defines as spouse, son, daughter, father, mother, brother or sister to the second generation of direct relatives. This will mean that the patient’s grandparents and grandchildren will also be able to donate their kidneys if they match.

This will enable more kidney transplants and still keep commercial dealings in check. The amendment also aims at making the penalties for people and hospitals violating the provisions of the act and indulging in illegal organ trade more stringent. It has been proposed to increase the punishment for organ trading hospitals, medical practitioners and donors from a minimum imprisonment of two years to a maximum of five to seven years with a fine of Rs 5 lakh upwards.

The amendment will also give an impetus to relatives of ‘brain dead’ patients for encouraging them to consider organ donation. “The current procedure is tedious and time-consuming with the law requiring a certificate from a neurosurgeon. The proposed amendment says that any surgeon can certify the donation, which makes the procedure simpler,” the official said.

At present, every hospital has a committee for taking a decision on transplants from those who are ‘brain dead’. None of these cases are referred to without certification from a neurosurgeon.

The new central law also spells out inclusion of tissues, bone marrow and bone transplants in the act, which was not there previously, the official added.