Police on VIP duty to undergo tougher psychological screening | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Police on VIP duty to undergo tougher psychological screening

The police have decided to review the existing psychological profiling mechanism that clears all personnel for VVIP and VIP security duty, after the incident in Tardeo on Wednesday, where a police naik deployed on a sensitive assignment shot dead his lover and killed himself with his service revolver.

mumbai Updated: Feb 21, 2013 02:11 IST
Debasish Panigrahi

The police have decided to review the existing psychological profiling mechanism that clears all personnel for VVIP and VIP security duty, after the incident in Tardeo on Wednesday, where a police naik deployed on a sensitive assignment shot dead his lover and killed himself with his service revolver.

A senior official from the Mumbai police’s protection and security department said that though the Tardeo incident was a “fluke” and therefore unpreventable, it has come as a wake-up call and the pre-induction mechanism will need to be strengthened further.

“The review of the psychological condition of every constable becomes a must, considering that the policemen have been put on extremely sensitive jobs,” the official said, on condition of anonymity.

At present, around 2,000 constables in the city are on VVIP and VIP protection duty.

The officer said the review of the existing mechanism for psychological profiling would incorporate the best practices followed across the world for police personnel deployed on similar duties.

“New parameters will be incorporated in the existing mechanism,” the official said.

As per the existing system, constables for protection and security duty are chosen through a screening process. Apart from physical fitness, they are vetted based on criteria such as alcoholism, absenteeism, violent antecedents (at home and outside) and lack of aptitude.

To keep track of post-induction performance, the department now plans to engage officials at the level of assistant police inspector and police inspector from within the unit as counsellors.

“These officers will be made responsible for counselling groups of 15 to 20 constables each, periodically. They will have to closely interact with them and spot signs of change in behaviour,” the officer said, adding that the moment any behavioural change is noticed, the concerned constable would be informed and asked to explain the reason.

If the change in behaviour can be rectified through counselling, the constable will be deemed fit to resume duty, or else shunted to normal policing, which is less taxing and less sensitive compared to protection duty of VVIPs and VIPs, the official explained.