Police train to use criminal tracking network system | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Police train to use criminal tracking network system

A criminal on the run will not be able to take advantage of the anonymity the city affords, as the Mumbai police will soon be able to check offences registered against him in any police station in the country via a network system.

mumbai Updated: Jan 06, 2011 02:40 IST
Mohamed Thaver

A criminal on the run will not be able to take advantage of the anonymity the city affords, as the Mumbai police will soon be able to check offences registered against him in any police station in the country via a network system.

The police are currently being trained on how to use the database.

Using the Crime and Criminal Tracking Network System, around 14,000 police stations in India will be linked to each other. That means a police station in the city will be able to access the details of a person and find out if he has any case registered against him in any part of the country.

"The training of personnel at the 90 police stations across Mumbai has started as part of the Crime and Criminal Tracking Network System," said Sanjeev Dayal, Mumbai commissioner of police.

"We are trying to train a minimum of three persons from each police station, who will be able to upload data of accused at their particular police station on the network. The database will contain details like the name of the accused along with the details of the complaint registered against him at that police station."

Only policemen will have access to the database, which is expected to be operational by September, said an officer on condition of anonymity.

"On many occasions, an criminal on the run settles down in another state where he does not have a record. In this case, if he ends up being arrested again or if the police find him suspicious, they can find out about his criminal background using the database. On many occasions, lack of coordination between the various police stations helps the accused. Now, such loopholes will be plugged," the officer added.

Sources said the police had also planned to upload photographs of the accused. Dayal said: "As of now, we will be updating the basic details. Uploading photographs in each case may require a lot of space. It may be considered in the future."

Pranav Badheka, technical head of Pal India Computer Institute, which is conducting the sessions, said: "As per my knowledge, 10 computers, an LCD projector and other equipment required for the training have been approved per district. We have been training policemen in the south and central region on all aspects from switching on a computer to advanced applications."