Post-grads for porters? | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Post-grads for porters?

The court administration raised the qualification required for the job to class 12 [second class] to scale the number of applications down. The shortlisting process has, thus left out a large number of applicants who would have otherwise qualified.

mumbai Updated: Apr 20, 2010 01:11 IST
HT Correspondent

At least 400 post-graduates and graduates are competing for 102 posts of porters [known as hamaal] with the City Civil and Sessions Court, a job that accepts candidates even if they have passed only class 7.

The court administration raised the qualification required for the job to class 12 [second class] to scale the number of applications down. The shortlisting process has, thus left out a large number of applicants who would have otherwise qualified.

At least 19,000 people, including 677 graduates, had applied for the job. The applicants included 64 people who hold masters degrees.Vijay Jadhav, a class 10 dropout, was disappointed. “We had the required qualification for the job. Was it our fault that large number of persons applied this time?” he asked.

Six aggrieved applicants had moved the Bombay High Court earlier this month after the sessions court administration shortlisted the candidates and brought the number down from 19,234 to 1,004.

The petitioners’ lawyer, Pradeep Thorat, had contended that it was unfair for the administration to change the criteria once it was published as an advertisement. The advertisement was published on January 25.

Vishwajeet Kapse, who argued for the court administration, had responded citing a Supreme Court order in a case in 2000. The apex court's verdict gives employers intrinsic authority to resort to short-listing during the selection process.

The high court dismissed the petition last week by accepting Kapse's contention and said the cut-off qualification had been applied only to reduce the number of eligible candidates to a manageable level. The high court found nothing arbitrary or irrational in the short-listing process

Applicants, however, are upset. Class 9 dropout and one of the petitioners, Suvarna Sakharkar, said, “I could not complete my education due to financial difficulties. Now what do I do?”

Jadhav said graduates and post-graduates were not willing to undertake physical labour. “They only want a back-door entry and go up the ladder through departmental examinations,”said another woman candidate requesting anonymity. The final round of interviews will be conducted on April 20.