Protests mark PM’s quiet visit to JNPT

  • G Mohiuddin Jeddy, Hindustan Times, Mumbai
  • Updated: Oct 12, 2015 01:28 IST
Protesters wave black flags at the JNPT during PM Modi’s visit. (Bachchan Kumar / HT)

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday laid the foundation stone for the fourth terminal at the Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT), the largest container handling port in the country.

Accompanying the PM for the ceremony held at the port in Uran were governor Ch Vidyasagar Rao, central shipping and ports minister Nitin Gadkari and chief minister Devendra Fadnavis. Much to the disappointment of the invitees, Modi did not speak at the event and left soon after unveiling the foundation stone.

A presentation in the form of a movie was shown at the programme, detailing the success of JNPT and its plans for the future along with the boost that it aims at providing to the Make in India policy.

The Uran Taluka All Party Sangharsh Samiti organised a protest rally over the Central government’s unfulfilled promises to project-affected people (PAP). The protestors held black flags and raised slogans against the government, claiming the PAP were being taken for a ride.

Present for the protest were Shiv Sena Mawal MP Shrirang Barne, Uran MLA Manohar Bhoir, PWP leader Vivek Patil and leaders of NCP, Congress, MNS and other parties. “Despite we being a part of the government, our demands are not being met. The Prime Minister had come to the city last year and made promises, which have not been kept,” said Barne.

“For the past 31 years the 12.5% land distribution issue to the JNPT PAP has not been resolved. The lethargy shown by the government has upset the farmers,” said Bhoir, also the president of the samiti.

Alleging that the protests were a stunt by some political parties, BJP leader Ramseth Thakur said, “One has to take into account the work for which the PM came to JNPT. Instead of showing him black flags, everyone needs to come together on the issue of development.

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