Quack’s medicines did not cure diseases: Victims | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Quack’s medicines did not cure diseases: Victims

A day after Munir Khan, the self proclaimed scientist, surrendered to the Versova police, hoards of his patients lined up outside the police station demanding their money back, reports HT Correspondent.

mumbai Updated: May 14, 2010 01:57 IST

A day after Munir Khan, the self proclaimed scientist, surrendered to the Versova police, hoards of his patients lined up outside the police station demanding their money back.

Khan, who surrendered after six months of evading arrest, is lodged in the Andheri lock up amongst petty criminals.

On his first day of interrogation, Khan told the police that he used a mixer, a strainer and a large vessel to prepare his ‘medicines’.

Police said the medicine that Khan claimed to have invented was nothing but a mixture of easily available ayurvedic herbs.

The Food and Drug Administration has already submitted its report to the police saying that the medicines had no healing capabilities.

“All the herbs in Khan’s medicines are basic seeds available at any medical store. However, he claims to have experimented with different mixtures and invented a miracle cure which could heal any disease,” said Kalpana Gadekar, police inspector with Versova police station.

Gadekar said that Khan has not yet admitted that he has cheated people. “He admits that he came up with the idea of selling the drugs all by himself,” said Gadekar. “He also says his medicines have cured more than 50,000 people and is 100 per cent effective,” added Gadekar.

The victims who spent money to buy Khan’s medicine are cursing him and are happy that he has been arrested.

Timma Kushalkar (47), an electrician who had gone to Khan for treatment of his now deceased mother who was suffering from a brain tumour said, “I had faith in him (Khan). But he is a fraud,” said Kushalkar.

“My mother was suffering from a brain tumour and doctors told me that it was incurable unless a surgery was performed. As my mother was afraid of surgeries, we thought of approaching Khan. I had seen his interview and was impressed with him.”

Kushalkar went to his clinic on October 10, 2009, and bought the tonic at Rs 15,600. However, when his mother took the medicine her condition worsened.

“When I went to the clinic again, I found that it had been raided and Khan was absconding. I immediately admitted my mother to the BSES hospital where she passed away in March,” he added.