‘Recruiting personnel, hi-tech arms not enough to fight terror’ | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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‘Recruiting personnel, hi-tech arms not enough to fight terror’

One of the fallouts of the November 26, 2008, terror attacks is that authorities are spending millions of dollars to buy security equipment in the city, reports HT Correspondent.

mumbai Updated: Nov 24, 2009 00:58 IST
HT Correspondent

One of the fallouts of the November 26, 2008, terror attacks is that authorities are spending millions of dollars to buy security equipment in the city.

The police, equipped with state-of-the-art technology and sophisticated weapons, conduct drills to check how prepared they are to combat terror.

At a seminar held at the NCPA on Monday to assess terror preparedness, Commissioner of Police D. Sivanandhan said: “We have gone a long way ahead from where we were when the 26/11 terrorist attack happened.”

The city has five Quick Response Teams comprising 200 police personnel, 13 Bomb Disposal and Detection Squads and 450 beat marshals, he said.

The police have bought 39 bulletproof vehicles, 600 combat vehicles, 160 beat marshal vehicles, bulletproof speedboats and amphibious vehicles. “Also, a Rs 2-crore state-of-the-art control room is under construction,” said Sivanandhan.

But loopholes continue to exist in certain areas, security experts pointed out.

“Recruiting more policemen or getting the latest weaponry will not suffice to stem terrorist attacks,” said Ajay Sahni, security analyst and executive director at the Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies, New Delhi.

“It might just help the force put a better response the next time an attack happens.”

The need of the hour is to transform the entire policing system, believe experts.

“The attitude of an average policeman has to change, only then can we fight terrorism,” said Sahni.

Ashok Bhan, director general of police (prisons) Jammu and Kashmir, said: “There has been considerable change in the situation in Jammu and Kashmir. But a lot of preparedness has gone into understanding the situation and strengthening our forces.”

One can not depend on the US to silence Pakistan, he said.

“We have to fight it on our own. Let us not mix the work of security forces with those on the negotiating table.”

KPS Gill, former director general of police (Punjab), said: “One of worst phases of militancy was wiped out in Punjab, just because of a concentrated effort from the police with the help of all political parties, except Akali Dal. It set a precedent and Tripura followed it.”