'Rivalry with Vora led to Dey's killing' | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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'Rivalry with Vora led to Dey's killing'

The much-awaited supplementary charge sheet in the J Dey murder case, involving journalist Jigna Vora, was filed in the designated MCOCA court on Tuesday. In the charge sheet, the prosecution has attributed Dey’s murder to the simmering professional rivalry between Vora and him. Vora, who was arrested on November 25 last year, is the eleventh accused in the case.

mumbai Updated: Feb 22, 2012 01:27 IST
HT Correspondent

The much-awaited supplementary charge sheet in the J Dey murder case, involving journalist Jigna Vora, was filed in the designated MCOCA court on Tuesday. In the charge sheet, the prosecution has attributed Dey’s murder to the simmering professional rivalry between Vora and him. Vora, who was arrested on November 25 last year, is the eleventh accused in the case.

Joint commissioner of police, crime, Himanshu Roy, told mediapersons that the prosecution had ‘enough’ corroborative evidence to suggest that the genesis of the conspiracy could be traced back to 2010 when the ‘enmity’ between Vora and Dey began over proximity to close Rajan aide Farid Tanasha.

Roy claimed that Vora’s conduct some time before and after the murder was suspicious. Corroborative evidence in the form of exchange of e-mails between Vora and Rajan (detailing Dey’s motorcycle number and home and office addresses), an increase in the number of telephone calls to Rajan before the murder, and her stoic silence following the murder, was enough to suggest her complete knowledge and involvement in the murder conspiracy, he said. “She may not have been directly (physically) involved in the murder, but she was nonetheless a conspirator,” Roy said.

Giving a synopsis of the supplementary charge sheet, Roy said the 1,471 page document is split into three volumes. There are 27 witnesses, and the witness statements run into 155 pages. Three of the witnesses have given their statement under oath (CrPC 164), which is admissible as evidence in the court.

Part one of the first volume includes brief facts of the case and Vora’s role in it, along with the sanction order of the commissioner of police to prosecute her. The second part includes the panchnama and details of the emails exchanged between Vora and Chhota Rajan.