Rs 23cr on roadwork: Our money down the drain | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Rs 23cr on roadwork: Our money down the drain

Walk down these roads and you realise you don’t need to be an expert to see that you have got a really bad deal for Rs 23.4 crore.

mumbai Updated: Aug 04, 2011 00:56 IST

Walk down these roads and you realise you don’t need to be an expert to see that you have got a really bad deal for Rs 23.4 crore.

Hindustan Times on Wednesday inspected 10 roads in four areas – Napean Sea Road, Matunga, Ghatkopar and Bandra – that were repaired and rebuilt less than six months ago.

These roads have uneven surfaces, sunken paver blocks, asphalt that is coming off and are liberally littered with potholes.

A perfect example is the Napean Sea Road on for which the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) is spending Rs 22.5 crore, among the highest amount being spent for such work. The work is the laying mastic asphalt on the 1.8-km road. Expected to have been ready by May, the BMC has put down that 89% of the work is done.

In reality, less than half the work is done, and that, shoddily. Several sections where asphalt has been laid have uneven surfaces and potholes.

In Ghatkopar (West), the BMC claims it has spent Rs 45 lakh to improve the roads and footpath in Jagdusha Nagar. Work was completed before March 31, the deadline. Majority of the stretch does not have footpath and the portions that have footpath have collapsed and lids of drains have caved in.

In Matunga, the lane numbers 2 and 3 have potholes. K Subramanium Road was rebuilt with paver blocks, though the contract is for an asphalt road. But it’s in good condition.

“The work order of Napean Sea Road was given last year. A 250 to 300-metre stretch was completed before the monsoon. Work will restart in October,” said Satish Badwe chief engineer, (roads).

“The key reason for bad roads is lack of supervision,” said Nandkumar Salvi, ex-BMC chief engineer and member of court-appointed road monitoring committee. “We monitor projects regularly,” Badwe said. Rahul Shewale, chairman of the civic standing committee, which handles the BMC treasury, said: “There is no check after we finish roadwork. I am pushing officers to go for quality testing before issuing the final payment,” he said.