Second merit list out: Marginal dip in cut-offs | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Second merit list out: Marginal dip in cut-offs

mumbai Updated: Jul 05, 2012 01:45 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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Cut-offs dropped by less than two percentage points across top city junior colleges when the second merit list was announced on Wednesday evening.

The science cut-off fell by less than one percentage point: to 93.09% at Sathaye College and Ruparel College and to 92.72% at Ruia College.

The fall in the commerce cut-offs was also slight with just a few marks getting shaved in the second list. At HR College, the cut-off fell from 91.26% to 90.6%, at NM College from 93.27% to 91.6% from 91.63% to 90.9% at RA Podar College.

The arts cut-off at St Xavier’s college fell by less than half a percentage point from 92% to 91.6%. “We didn’t have too many seats, so as expected the fall was marginal,” said Kavita Rege, principal of Sathaye College.

College principals said if they had a third list, it would most likely be very small. “There might be some slight movement but not much,” said Shobhana Vasudevan, principal of RA Podar College.

Disappointed students who did not make it to a higher preference college in the second round still have one betterment option. However, those who made it to a higher preference college in the second round have exhausted the single betterment option.

“I wish there had been two more betterment options,” said Ashi Gupta, 16, who missed her first option, Jai Hind College for the science stream by three marks and has no betterment option remaining.

A total of 51,798 students were allotted seats in the second round of allocations, with 8,425 students managing to make it to their top choice college and 32,758 students were granted a higher preference college through the betterment option. In the second round, there were around 19,000 students who were freshly allotted seats. However, after two rounds of online admissions, 14,000 students are still without a junior college seat.

“I haven’t got any college at all, this is a big problem,” said a student who scored 60% in Class 10.

Officials have said there is one more round and students should not worry. “Everyone will get a seat,” said an education department official.

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