Soon, register your new vehicles online

  • Kailash Korde, Hindustan Times, Mumbai
  • Updated: Aug 03, 2015 10:21 IST

Planning to buy a new car? You may soon be able to register it online at the time of purchase and pay taxes and fees as well without visiting the regional transport office (RTO).

The state transport department has been trying out an upgraded version of the vehicle registration software —Vahan 4.0 — at the Wadala and Pune RTOs since mid-July.

If successful, the software will also allow dealers to access the link for registration of vehicles.

“At present, the system is not in the public domain and trials are being conducted virtually,” said a source, adding that the checks will be completed in three months and thereafter the system will be extended to other RTOs.

“The new version of Vahan is likely to be commissioned before Dussehra,” said a senior official, adding that a team from Wadala RTO has been sent to NIC, Pune, for training.

In the new system, there will be a citizen’s interface allowing people to upload documents and make payments at the time of registration.

Also, as the vehicle details will be fed in the system at the time of manufacturing, its movement can be tracked at every stage.

“People will be updated through text messages during the registration process. This process is followed at present as well,” said an NIC official, adding that people can even avail of e-payment option through registered banks.

Currently, the lower version of the software, introduced in 2007, is being used.

But despite submitting necessary details and paying hefty fees to vehicle dealers, many owners are forced to go to the RTO to complete the registration formalities.

According to sources, the new system will bring transparency and curb bogus registrations.

“In the existing system, the vehicle data remains only on the RTO server. However, with the new one, nation-wide vehicle data will be stored on a centralised server and all RTOs will be connected to it,” said the NIC official.

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