Special courts would help control our corrupt netas | mumbai | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 24, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Special courts would help control our corrupt netas

Corrupt officers are anti-national and anti-social elements. Alert citizens should be encouraged to report a bribe. This will help keep all the Chavans and Rajas in control.

mumbai Updated: Nov 21, 2010 01:50 IST

Special courts would help control our corrupt netas

Corrupt officers are anti-national and anti-social elements. Alert citizens should be encouraged to report a bribe. This will help keep all the Chavans and Rajas in control. A corrupt officer is a loss to effective governance, public revenue, and a greater loss to the society. Many times, a bribe-payer is left with no option but to adopt the easy (read corrupt) path. Separate courts like debt recovery tribunals would help bring about a positive change.

AK Mehta

Clean up your act, India Inc

Corporate India is accountable for the spurt in bribery cases in the country. Sometimes the bribe-payer gives in to pressure from a powerful authority. Bribe is a form of hafta, demanded by an authority for smooth transaction of a job. Corporate India should collectively decide not to offer a bribe. This will enable the government to take action against the culprits. It could play the role of the whistle-blower, as it is in a position to tame the evil. However, both parties are to blame and no one who gives or takes a bribe should get away with it.

Prem Menon

Even school kids know how to bribe

The only way to pull our country out of the corruption whirlpool is to eradicate corruption at a fundamental level. Even school students know they can shut a traffic policeman’s mouth with a bribe. This is where we need a ‘clean up’. Middle-class people know that any government-related work can be done quickest and most easily if they offer a quick buck. It is the bribe-payer who needs to wake up. The lethargic attitude of officials compels the common man to pay a bribe in order to get the work done faster. High time that India plugged the ever-increasing list of scandals — Bofors, Fodder, the recent 2G and Adarsh scam. We have had enough, Mr PM.

Maryam Pardawala

Most schools are corrupt too Politicians alone do not make up the corrupt lot. Even for admission in a decent educational institution, management seats are auctioned. In the name of donations, admissions are on sale and the rich parents, who want to give their kids the best, make a grab for them. Corruption has become a household phenomenon. In the Adarsh and 2G scam, the politicians asked to resign are sheer scapegoats. There are others who will never be pulled up. The need of the hour is a special anti-corruption court.

Cajetan Peter D’Souza

What choice do we have but to pay the bribes?

Everyone talks about corruption at high levels, involving top politicians and bureaucrats, but what about the corruption that thrives in the common man’s life? It would be near-impossible to live in India without becoming part of the corruption. How would we get anything done, any documents sourced, or our children admitted to school?

Dr Siddhartha Gavaskar

We must publicly shame both sides

The solution to bribery has two forms: legal action and public shaming, which could be performed by the publication of reports detailing those involved in even minor cases of corruption. The fight against bribery cannot be one sided. The bribe-payer and the bribe-taker must both be taught a lesson.

Ashalata Waghe

The system is rotten and needs to be fixed

The bribe-payer can’t be blamed, as he has been taught by the bribe-taker. Anyone who needs to get his work done knows that he has to pass a buck under — or over — the table. With life running at such a fast pace, sometimes it is impossible to wait. In today’s world, and given our bureaucracy, Gandhian principles would not work.

Pretty Mirchandani