State to frame policy for energy audit | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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State to frame policy for energy audit

The government is thinking of formulating an energy audit policy that will make energy audits mandatory for all government buildings and offices in the state, reports Ketaki Ghoge.

mumbai Updated: May 12, 2010 02:19 IST
Ketaki Ghoge

The government is thinking of formulating an energy audit policy that will make energy audits mandatory for all government buildings and offices in the state.

The environment department mooted the proposal to promote energy conservation and set an example for the private sector and domestic consumers. The Environment, Energy and Public Works departments will have to chalk out the policy together.

“We have moved a note to introduce an energy audit policy for state government buildings, which have considerable energy saving potential. There are around 40 agencies empanelled by the Centre to conduct such audits,’’ said Environment Secretary Valsa Nair Singh.

An energy audit refers to a study on patterns of energy consumption in a building, analysing sources of input and efficiency of devices. The audit can help government offices reduce energy losses, identify devices that are less energy efficient, and even explore energy efficient mechanisms that can lead to savings.

Rajasthan and Tamil Nadu have already started similar initiatives.

The main objective of the audit is to stop the wastage of energy and given the severe power crunch of 7,000 MW in the state.

“Audit firms can be asked to work under performance contracts that require them to conduct audits, suggest energy efficiency measures and demonstrate savings by operating energy facilities in select buildings for a period of time,’’ said a senior Energy department official. The firms can be paid from the energy savings they generate.

The Singapore government saved Singapore $30 million [Rs 979 crore] by subsidising energy audits in 121 buildings. The savings through changes in air conditioning systems alone worked out to Singapore $1.2 million [Rs 3.4 crore] a year.

Estimates have revealed that government buildings have an energy saving potential of 20 to 30 per cent. To tap this potential, the state had issued a circular in January to convert most electrical devices in government offices to CLF bulbs, tubes and fan regulators labelled with four or five stars by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency. The proposed shift was to be made within six months, so far the mid term report on energy conservation has not been favourable.