Sun-plugged: Learning how to use solar energy for practical purposes | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Sun-plugged: Learning how to use solar energy for practical purposes

If you’re wondering how to use solar power for your cooking chores or want to power lights in your building using solar panels, head to the city’s first festival on low-carbon solar festival – Sunplugged GreenKarbon Solar Festival.

mumbai Updated: Jan 17, 2013 00:52 IST
HT Correspondent

If you’re wondering how to use solar power for your cooking chores or want to power lights in your building using solar panels, head to the city’s first festival on low-carbon solar festival – Sunplugged GreenKarbon Solar Festival.

The three-day festival, which starts on January 18, has been organised by Bhavan’s college, Andheri (west) in association with Sanctuary Asia magazine.

The festival aims to highlight the untapped potential of solar energy in urban as well as in rural areas. “We want to push people to think in the direction of renewable energy. Most people hesitate to invest in solar power because it is costlier than conventional energy. But we would showcase various urban household utilities that can be run on solar power with a one-time investment,” said Bittu Sahgal, vice-president of GreenKarbon and editor, Sanctuary Asia. On Wednesday, Deepak Gadhia from the Baroda-based Muni Seva Ashram that is collaborating with the solar festival demonstrated the use of aluminum solar reflectors that have been used at the Shirdi Sai Baba temple to feed 50,000 people each day.

“Solar reflectors are a great alternative to firewood in rural areas. With plenty of space available, villages can use these reflectors for cooking, heating and even for biomass plants,” said Gadhia. The festival will also provide water to participants using a solar distillation.

Talking about the festival, Bhavan’s college principal Vasanti Katchi said, “We want to make Sunplugged an annual event and gradually make the transition to a carbon neutral campus with maximum power generated using renewable energy such as solar, wind and biomass.”