Surviving 9 patients not to be isolated | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Surviving 9 patients not to be isolated

Blood samples of the 12 patients detected with totally drug-resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB) by Hinduja hospital will be sent to the National Institute of Tuberculosis (NIT), Bangalore.

mumbai Updated: Jan 19, 2012 01:40 IST
HT Correspondent

Blood samples of the 12 patients detected with totally drug-resistant tuberculosis (TDR-TB) by Hinduja hospital will be sent to the National Institute of Tuberculosis (NIT), Bangalore.

“We are sending the samples to NIT for reconfirmation of the tests,” said Dr PY Gaikwad, joint director, state health department. Three of these patients have died in the past two months.

The state has decided not to isolate the surviving nine patients. “These patients need not be isolated. These are not acutely sick patients. They are chronic patients. They are not all bed-ridden. There is a rickshaw driver, a tailor, and a housewife. We cannot ask them to stay away from their home indefinitely,” said Gaikwad.

Seven of the nine patients are from Mumbai and have now been covered by the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) programme. They will be given a salvage regimen, of which three are responding to treatment, confirmed Dr Suresh Gupta, director of health services.

“We have examined the seven patients from Mumbai and four of their samples turned out negative in the first scrotum microscopy test,” said Dr Suresh Gupta, director of health services (DHS).

Gupta clarified that scrotum microscopy test was the first test to detect TB. A second test is needed to confirm the disease. “Another test will have to be done to check the drug resistance,” he added.

As part of the pilot project to tackle the problem of TDR-TB in the city, the civic body will add more beds in the Sewree TB Hospital.. “We will also get a laboratory that is on par with the newly-accredited laboratory at JJ hospital. The emphasis will be on early detection,” said Manisha Mhaiskar, additional municipal commissioner.

Using the malaria-control protocol, the civic body will reach out to the doctors and insist on notifying drug-resistant tuberculosis to RNTCP programme officials.

“Each doctor who will notify patients and ensures that the patient follows the treatment protocol will be given an honorarium of Rs2,500,” said Jayant Banthia, state additional chief secretary, health and family welfare.

As under the BMC Act, TB is a notifiable disease. This will be strictly followed and all private doctors will have to report to the RNTCP centre.

“We discussed making TB a notifiable disease across the country now,” said Gaikwad.