TCS team to develop solution for a paperless Mantralaya | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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TCS team to develop solution for a paperless Mantralaya

Last week’s fire at the Mantralaya that destroyed lakhs of documents is likely to propel the state government faster towards a ‘paperless regime’.

mumbai Updated: Jun 27, 2012 02:43 IST
HT Correspondent

Last week’s fire at the Mantralaya that destroyed lakhs of documents is likely to propel the state government faster towards a ‘paperless regime’.

Five days after the incident, the state on Tuesday, started working earnestly on the concept. A team of experts from Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), Gujarat, has been called in to customise a solution for Maharashtra as soon as possible.

The state government first mooted digital governance in the state secretariat in 2006. But it was only in 2011 that a formal agreement was signed with TCS to roll out Maharashtra Online, a citizen service portal.

“A part of that project was complete digitalisation of our files and processes. Our IT office is mostly digitialised; the National Rural Health Mission is completely paperless. But, now we have asked TCS to speed up customising a solution for us,’’ said IT secretary Rajesh Aggarwal.

The TCS team had originally developed a software framework called DigiGov for Gujarat government years ago. The state is looking at either a customised version of DigiGov or a software called e-Office, used by NRHM, to be implemented in its offices.

Once the new system gets installed, all documents will be scanned and transformed into digital files. Files won’t move physically from one desk to another but can be accessed and tracked digitally by officials. The government offices will eventually stop generating new paper files. Documents procured from citizens or other parties will be scanned, then stored in a separate fire-safe records room. “This is an opportunity to move to a paperless office,’’ said chief minister Prithviraj Chavan. He added that some offices in Delhi are already scanning every sheet of paper that comes in.