UK police plans to introduce Mohalla Committee system | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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UK police plans to introduce Mohalla Committee system

mumbai Updated: Mar 12, 2011 01:53 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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The UK will soon implement the Mumbai police’s Mohalla Committee System.

On Friday, a contingent of five officers from the West Midland police was in the city to briefly study the procedure adopted by the Mumbai police during investigations of crimes.

The team, led by chief superintendent of West Midland police, Mick Gillick, visited the director general of police, AV Parasnis, and other police officers.

Explaining the rationale behind the visit, Gillick said, “We have a big Indian community in the UK. And it is important for us to understand the [Indian] culture, to interact with the community and have an acceptance among common people.”

“The Mohalla Committee System is a great system to bring together people who do not ordinarily interact with each other,” said Gillick.

He intends to implement the system in his jurisdiction.

“It will also help us increase accountability within the system. There are instances where police officers make mistakes, and the system would help us understand how people perceive them,” he added.

He asserted that by developing trust in people through the implementation of this system, they were confident of improving their investigations.

Gillick said that they were in the process of devising a system through which they can make people aware of the Mohalla committee meetings.

Gillick and his team are planning to visit the Delhi and Punjab police later. “We want to familiarise ourselves with the Punjabi culture too,” said Gillick.

The team is also considering an exchange programme whereby police officers from the UK would be sent to India to study the pattern of crime investigation in India in a detailed manner.

Last year, India had sent 100 officers to Cambridge to study the procedure of criminal investigation in the UK.