Unapproved course costs med college Rs1 lakh fine | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Unapproved course costs med college Rs1 lakh fine

The Bombay high court on Thursday directed Dr DY Patil Medical College at Navi Mumbai to pay Rs1 lakh to a medical professional for wasting her academic year by admitting her to a secondary DNB (Diploma in National Board) course without having the necessary accreditation.

mumbai Updated: Jan 06, 2012 02:13 IST
Kanchan Chaudhari

The Bombay high court on Thursday directed Dr DY Patil Medical College at Navi Mumbai to pay Rs1 lakh to a medical professional for wasting her academic year by admitting her to a secondary DNB (Diploma in National Board) course without having the necessary accreditation.

“She has lost a valuable part of her professional career, time, effort and money, and is therefore required to be compensated,” the division bench of justices DY Chandrachud and Amjad Sayed noted while granting relief to Dr Nupur Dhankani.

“The fourth respondent [the medical college] could not have been unmindful of the serious consequences of admitting students without having valid permission for conducting the course,” the judges observed while noting that the premier institution could not have admitted any student for the course.

Dr Dhankani had enrolled for a secondary DNB course in paediatrics at the college in February last year. She approached the high court after she received an undated letter from the National Board of Examinations, which grants accreditation for DNB courses, returning her application for registration for the course which was endorsed by the college.

The board intimated her that accreditation of Dr DY Patil Medical College for all DNB courses had been withdrawn in July 2011. But the accreditation had lapsed before that — the board had granted provisional accreditation to the college in August 2007 for conducting DNB courses for a period of three years, from January 2008 to December 2010.

The judges were irked to note that the provisional accreditation accorded by the board to the medical college had lapsed in December 2010, and despite that, the college enrolled Dr Dhankani for the course three months later.

The medical college maintained that the candidate had been admitted prior to July 2011, when it was intimated about the cancellation of the accreditation, and there was no mala fide intention on its part in granting her admission.