Vasai acid attack: ‘Regulate sale of acid in the market’ | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Vasai acid attack: ‘Regulate sale of acid in the market’

Even though the law has been made more stringent to curb acid attacks, experts say the sale of the corrosive liquid is still a cause for concern.

mumbai Updated: Nov 20, 2014 22:28 IST
HT Correspondent

Even though the law has been made more stringent to curb acid attacks, experts say the sale of the corrosive liquid is still a cause for concern.

The recently amended subsection 326 A of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) has been applied in the Vasai acid attack case. The subsection, which was revised in 2013, now carries a minimum punishment of 10 years in cases of acid attack, which can be extended to a life term.

“Speedy trials and faster conviction is the need of the hour. The sale of acid should be controlled and the procedure for its procurement should be made stringent,” said YP Singh, former IPS official turned lawyer. He said, “Sale of acid should only be allowed through a permit. CCTV cameras should be installed in the shops selling acids, which will record footage of buyers. It should be made mandatory for the buyer to submit identity proof before purchasing acid.”

“Acid is the cheapest cleaning agent that is available in the market, and so it is important to regulate its sale in the market,” said professor Dr Vibhuti Patel, head, department of economics, SNDT Women’s University.

Earlier, section 326 of the IPC dealt with cases of voluntarily causing hurt. In 2013, new subsections A and B were added, dealing with acid attacks. Under these subsections, acid is defined as a substance that is corrosive in nature, results in burns and is capable of causing bodily injury leading to scars, disfigurement and causing disability that is temporary or permanent.

MN Singh, former Mumbai police commissioner, said, “Domestic violence is very common in Indian households, and so it is very important to speak up about it.”

PS Pasricha, former director general of police, said, “The sale of acid should be regulated, except for essential usage in hospitals and laboratories. Strict action should also be taken against sellers if they violate the norms.”