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We need stricter laws, stricter implementation

mumbai Updated: Sep 05, 2010 00:09 IST
We need stricter laws

The truth is, we need better, more stringent laws — and more stringent enforcement of these laws.

If a drunk driver faced the prospect of life in prison, for instance, it is unlikely he would succumb to temptation and take that last tippled. It would also help if he knew for a certainty that public and political outrage meant no traffic policeman would take a few thousand rupees to change their testimony — or a few hundred rupees to let him go.

Most of all, we motorists need to see this as a truly serious, life-threatening offence. We have made the switch from seeing drink-driving as a game of chance to seeing it as a traffic offence. We need to go a step further and think of the possible repercussions of our carelessness.

S. Shah

Don’t want to pay? Pick another school

I write this with pain in my heart as a teacher and a parent. I believe students should bring glory to a school and I am distressed to see the tussle between Vibgyor and a certain parent.

As I understand it, Vibgyor is not a monopoly. If they charged that much more than the competition, surely they would have had to shut down by now. That’s basic market economics.

Besides, parents now take undue pride in getting their kids admitted to expensive schools, and then don’t want the fees hiked.

A possible alternative for the parents of Adhishree is to start an affordable school themselves. In my opinion, that would be better than going to the Supreme Court.

Govind Gadiyar

Still no pruning for our trees

This is with reference to ‘Ad agency cuts tree in Khar, fined Rs 10,000’ (September 3, Page 5). Khar resident Aftab Siddiqui makes the Gardens department sound so efficient, but I have been running from pillar to post to get the trees in our south Mumbai compound trimmed and the rotten trees uprooted.

One is tilting dangerously and two of the branches have already crashed to the ground. And some of these trees overlook a heavily congested street.

The BMC first asked for a letter with photographs, but the person who delivered it was told to pay some money too, which we refused to do. That was a year and a half ago. After reading this article, I called again and was told the photographs must be taken by a ‘specialist’. If there is an accident, who will take the blame?

Jamini Ahluwalia

In politics, the truth often hurts

This is with reference to ‘IAS officer gets rap for violating disciplinary rules’ (September 2, Page 6), which reported that Chief Minister Ashok Chavan was upset with Uttam Khobragade for saying that government-run ashramshalas are a mess.

The fact of the matter is, the truth hurts, especially in politics. What a pity that Chavan has chosen to respond with an investigation into whether an IAS official can make such statements in public — rather than trying to find out if what he said is true.

If an IAS officer praises a minister, that is acceptable. But criticism is taboo. Where are the ethics in that?

Madhukar Ambekar

Great feature on running

I was delighted to see another page dedicated to the cause of running in your Friday edition.

As a runner for nearly 30 years, I have watched the sport evolve in Bombay. And how things have changed.

Today, there is truly a running culture in the city, where very little existed three decades ago. People aren’t experiencing a midlife crisis, but a midlife resurgence, going by the number of serious runners in their 40s and 50s.

Sadly, the running infrastructure hasn’t exactly kept pace. And that is why I am delighted to see you give the sport its due.

All power to you guys!

Milton Frank