Website to connect visually impaired with readers, writers | mumbai | Hindustan Times
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Website to connect visually impaired with readers, writers

Kailash Tandel, a visually impaired social worker, often finds it difficult to locate a reader or a writer to help him with paperwork. But with the launch of a new website that helps the visually impaired connect with suitable readers, writers and NGOs, his life is likely to get easier.

mumbai Updated: Apr 12, 2010 01:09 IST
Aarefa Johari

Kailash Tandel, a visually impaired social worker, often finds it difficult to locate a reader or a writer to help him with paperwork. But with the launch of a new website that helps the visually impaired connect with suitable readers, writers and NGOs, his life is likely to get easier.

“During exams, when the schedules of different schools and colleges clash, it becomes difficult to find writers,” said Tandel (26). “So such as website would be very useful.”

The portal, www.voicevision.in, was launched on Sunday by Voice Vision, a computer-training institute for the visually impaired. Created to make the visually impaired independent in a technology driven world, the institute has helped more than 50 students build their careers in the 10 years since its inception.

Besides the reader-writer module, it includes an NGO module listing all the non-profit organisations working for the blind, a link to hunt for mentors and a blog for an exchange of ideas. Visually impaired persons, NGOs, and anyone who wishes to help can create profiles to participate in the activities.

“There is a lot of information available online, but not all of it is easily accessible to us,” said Sushmeetha Bubna (36), the founder of Voice Vision, who wants this website to be an encyclopaedia for all sight-impaired people in India.

For Rajesh Mehta, Voice Vision’s first student and now a successful manager at an IT firm, bringing in new technological advancements was an important move for the institute. “I would suggest starting a matrimonial module since so many parents worry about getting their visually impaired children married,” said the 28-year-old who lost his sight at eight.